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Artist Spotlight: Alex Goad

Name, age, occupation, location?
Alex Goad, 24, Industrial Designer, Melbourne
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What do you try to achieve with your art?
So basically I work in two different areas which tend to overlap one another. I’m technically an industrial designer, I graduated from Monash last year, but I also work as a sculptor. My Industrial design work is mostly done through a studio business I run with a friend; we have done restaurant interiors, small products, commercial installations and some furniture pieces. But I think the most exciting Industrial design work I do is through a company that I have co-founded called Reef Design Lab (
www.reefdesignlab.com ) . This area is also what I did my final Honours project on, it is basically the design and construction of artificial reefs - Not surfing artificial reefs (however we are going to be looking into that in the future) but rather artificial reefs for marine habitat that has been degraded and needs restoring. We basically create these hard complex structures out of appropriate materials such as marine grade concrete, ceramics and some composite materials designing them in ways that make the implementation process easier and more economical. Once these structures are underwater organisms begin to grow on the surface and over time (1-3years) you get a fully functioning marine ecosystem. It’s a really cool area of work, you could basically say its designing homes for fish. There are some really interesting developments with the manufacturing technologies that we are able to use as well, 3D printing is now possible in concrete so the possibilities for complex habitat design are literally endless!!!!
The sculpture I do is obviously all inspired by the ocean, one sculpture range I have done was inspired by the invasive star fish we have in Port Phillip Bay called the Northern Pacific Sea Star. You can see these guys throughout the bay as they slowly destroy native habitat. They are in the thousands under St Kilda Pier in the winter months. So I guesssss you could say I am trying to create awareness with these sculptures but I don’t think anyone pays attention to that haha. Doing industrial design at uni we learn a multitude of manufacturing techniques and I try to utilise that in my sculptural work as well. For example I’ve been learning how you can use the surfboard manufacturing process to do heaps of crazy large scale forms for a relatively reasonable price. I’ve been lucky because I have had the chance to work from a huge factory in Mentone where we have heaps of space to experiment its sick!

In your opinion, can people learn to be creative or are they born that way?
Tough one !!!! I guess some people are more interested in being creative then others and some take it more seriously then others.

Other creative outlets?
Skating !!!!!! I’m always down at the local Elsty Bowl and hitting up St Kilda doing the same boring bowl runs I’ve been doing since 2005 but still getting that rush everytime!!! Surfing as well but I’m shit as but super keen!!! I’m a big free diver and scuba diver, always keen to travel.

What music do you listen to when you are creating your art?
Lifelike, Fred Falke, triple J, 80’s 90’s everything I guess but no one seems to like my music, I always get paid out!!! Help me Dolly Doctor !!!

What is your dream project?
There’s an artist called Jason de Caires Taylor, I would love to work for him on one of his big installations in Cancun ! He does all the underwater sculptures that are always being blogged about, really really beautiful work! Plus it’s in Cancun! It’s a sick place !

How can people support you?
Like our Facebook page for Reef Design Lab, we are going to be posting heaps of pics of what we are doing and we really need public support to encourage local councils to implement these artificial reef systems.
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cash cam
Ellen O’Neal, the greatest woman freestyle skateboarder in the 1970s.

This year (2030) we saw more shark attacks than ever previously recorded in Australia, with 10 reported fatalities. All research is pointing towards human activity as the trigger - sharks are finding less of their natural food from over-fishing and population growth is increasing number of daily sea-goers and overall shark to human interactions. We are urging people to ignore the mainstream media, as you are much more likely to die from a car accident on your drive to the beach than you are in the water by a shark.

FLOAT LIKE A FEATHER, STOMP LIKE A SUMOillustration by GLENNZ  - http://glennz.tumblr.com/
pourbrew:

My dad teaching math in Southern California (late 70’s/early 80’s) via /r/OldSchoolCool http://ift.tt/1znnOwH

Hitcase Review

The camera on the iPhone is pretty amazing these days. So it’s always a treat when companies bring out products that enhance the iPhone camera even more. This is exactly what Hitcase have done.

In a nut shell, this case basically transforms your phone into a GoPro, well that’s what it feels like anyway.

First impressions out of the box, was that it’s a chunky beast. Don’t know how If I would want to use my phone through the Hitcase as a permanent fixture… but its an easy addition to pop on when you really need it. On the beach, at the skatepark, or any other extreme activity.

The box claims it to be waterproof & shockproof. I can say that it is very snug when the phone is inside, and pretty confident that it can take a few bumps. I tested the waterproof claim with a little trick I learned in film school, which everyone should do before putting their $900 iphone under water. Pop a bit of tissue inside the case, lock the case up and get it wet. If the tissue is dry at the end, all is good. And the tissue was dry!

Using the case when filming skateboarding was good. The fisheye is as wide as you’re gonna get for an iPhone, and they didn’t skimp on the quality of the glass.

The mount is great too. It’s a very GoPro style mount, and simple to slide on and off. It feels just as sturdy as a GoPro mount and I’d be confident in mounting the case to my bike or my board. It aint going anywhere.

Using the touch screen on the iPhone got a bit unresponsive because of the plastic on the front of the case, I found myself having to press harder than usual… but that is the trade off if you want a full waterproof solution. I think it’s an excellent product to have in your bag of tricks, but I wouldn’t wear it on my phone permanently. I will definitely keep this little guy up my sleeve and break it out when I need to.

Check out the Hitcase Australia Website, Facebook & Twitter.

Review by Andrew Dorn from Ramped Slow Mo

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Artist Spotlight: Laura Bush (Elbie)

Name, age, occupation, location?
Laura Bush [Elbie], 27 -though a perpetual teenager,  illustrator/youth worker with aspirations to be a designer, and Denmark, South-West Aus.image What’s your story?
I grew up in Kalgoorlie, a mining town on the cusp of the Great Victoria Desert. There wasn’t much to do as a kid but skate or draw. I’m not super good with co-ordination, so I chose the latter.  I studied Visual Arts for a year at Curtin and hated it. Was drunk and miserable the entire time. Then tried out fashion at RMIT in Melbourne, which was fine. 

I lived in London for a few years with an illustration collective, whilst interning at Louise Gray and Claire Barrow. Claire taught me how to paint on leather and through her I got a job creating a capsule collection for the Australian label Friend of Mine. And along the way I’ve worked at various bars and art stores; met a lot of cool people too.
When are you most inspired/who inspires you?
After a run, or if I can’t sleep I’ll try to do some drawing. I get some crazy ideas from lucid dreaming. Like when you wake from a deep sleep and try to go back but you’re kind of aware- that’s awesome.  
Illustration for me is cathartic, it gets me out of my head. Like, after I lost my virginity I went home and tried to draw it. Haha, I went through an Audrey Beardsley erotica phase. So, at work its hard to tell off the boys for drawing dicks, when really I want to hi-5 them for their attention to detail.
Or if I get my heart broken I’ll try to rage it out with a ‘fuck you’ illustration. I guess my emotions dictate my drawing. :)
In terms of other peoples work, I really like medieval/renaissance paintings. Bosch did some wild shit. Caravaggio, El Greco. All great.
There’s this illustrated, imaginary encyclopedia called ‘Codex Seraphinianus  by this italian dude, I think he was a product designer? Anyway, he just decided one day to create his own world. I really like that. He even made his own language which still to this day, baffles linguist specialists because it makes no sense. 
William Blakes biblical illustrations are insane. They’re watercolours and the muscle tones of his characters are super pronounced. 
Ralph Steadman -he’s the illustrator that did the ‘Fear and Loathing’ works, he also did illustrations for George Orwell’s ‘Animal Farm’. He’s lines are so expressive and nasty. That was such a perfect pairing, I really love that book. 
The pinnacle for me would be Moebius and James Jean. They’re amazing, their colour palettes, their linework, subject matter - it’s all perfect. that’s the skill level that I’m striving for. If I could draw like them, I’d die happy.
What is your philosophy on life?
I don’t have an answer for that, there’s a lot I’m still trying to figure out. But I guess, be kind,  be receptive, and embrace impermanence. It’d be good to have a better understanding of taxation and shit- but you know, baby steps.
What is the hardest thing about what you do?
Explaining a work? People love a story and a meaning, but more often then not, I don’t have one. I started with a singular idea and along the way, the piece evolved and this is what I ended up with. I never know when I start, exactly what I’m going to produce. So I think, besides the financial struggle and self-promotion, trying to give a meaning to a piece when there isn’t one, is hard. People want a justification, or a reasoning to create. I don’t know, I draw because I always have. Does that sound wanky?
Other creative outlets?
My friend Erin [@ehkluedo] and I have been working on a womenswear label DAMFOL. It’s going to be durable separates, kind of like Osh Kosk for adults. And I’ll be making prints for it.  DAMFOL was the local skate crew in Kalgoorlie, and I really loved that ‘lost boys’ attitude- ‘us against the world’.  We’re no where near being able to release yet, but ultimately thats the goal.
Favourite music?
So many! I go on these massive youtube binges whilst I’m drawing. Opeth, Mastodon, Fantasia, Shuggy Otis, Dylan, the Donnie Darko soundtrack. My taste in music is completely erratic. I’m just a curious beast, so I’m always up for something new or discovering something forgotten. I really like mixtapes too: Lucki Eck$, Deathgrips and old hip hop Ego Trip mixes.
What is your dream project & what are your next steps?
Besides DAMFOL, I’d like to do a series of surfboards like the ‘Hellmouth’ one I just did, maybe tee something up with one of the local shapers. I’d love to design a set of tarot cards, take a few years to complete it; and maybe do some big sprawling pieces like Boschs ‘The Last Judgement’. I rarely work larger that A3, so it’d be good to challenge myself. 
How can people support you?
I’m on instagram @elbiopoly, tumblr is elbiedraws.com.au, and I’ve an exhibition for the month of October at the William Street Bird in Northbridge. I’m going to do some live drawing there next week if you want to come down and say hello.  I’m not selling prints at this stage, but I’ll eventually get around to that. You can find me on facebook too - it’s not a artist page, but it’s all the same thing. Supports great, I love getting feedback and hearing other peoples interpretations of my work!
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Clarity in West Oz

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